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Sample Lessons

Teach in Ontario

Grade 6 Data Management Activity

Mr. Scott's class is working on a data management exercise. The students have been told to collect data on their classmates' favourite games, display the data in a bar graph and make a prediction about whether this data is representative of the entire school.

Mr. Singh's class is working on a similar activity, but he has integrated into the activity different levels of difficulty, a variety of options for work groups, choices that meet the interests of his students and options for demonstrating knowledge.

For the group of students in his class who have a difficult time working with large numbers and a lot of data, Mr. Singh has designed an activity with manageable data. They are required to survey students in the class to find the students' favourite dessert, athletic shoe company or sport. They may work independently or in small groups. They must choose the most appropriate type of graph on which to display this data. They are also required to make a prediction about whether this data is representative of the entire school, and explain their reasoning. The report of their findings may take the form of a presentation, a written report or a short debate.

Another activity has been designed to challenge those students more able to work with large data sets and a number of variables. Those who choose this activity are asked to study a baseball player's career hitting statistics or a basketball player's career shooting statistics and create a graph displaying the statistics over time. Students may work individually, in pairs or in small groups. The students must also make a prediction about the player's probability of success in the next season. This prediction must be supported with evidence of reasoning and consideration of factors that affect the statistics. The report may take the form of a written document, a broadcast discussion by a group of sports analysts, a visual representation or a presentation.

In each of the activities, students are given choices to meet their ability level, their preferred working style, their interests and their learning style. All students are working on the same expectation and all students are able to participate in class discussions about the findings.

Grade 11 English Activity

Mrs. Khan's Grade 11 students are working with short stories. Mrs. Khan has designed activities based on the choice made by the main character in the short story when faced with a moral dilemma. Her students demonstrate a variety of learning styles, ability levels and interests. She has taken all of these differences into account when designing the activities. She is offering two activity choices to her class.

The first activity asks that students identify the moral dilemma faced by the main character in the short story. Students choosing this activity must explain the dilemma and how the choice made by the character affected the rest of the story. Those choosing this activity must also explain how the character traits of the main character contributed to the choice he/she made and provide proof of these traits. Demonstration of learning may take the form of a presentation, a written report or an artistic representation of their knowledge.

The second activity also involves identification of the moral dilemma faced by the main character, the character traits that lead to the main character's decision in the face of this dilemma and the effect this choice had on the rest of the story. In addition, students are asked to compare the choice made by the main character in the short story to that of another main character in a previously read short story. Students choosing this activity must outline the similarities and differences in character traits of the two characters and explain how these character traits led to the decisions made when faced with a moral dilemma. Learning may be demonstrated through a written report with a venn diagram, a presentation or a rewrite of the ending with the main character making a different choice when facing the moral dilemma. The alternate ending must contain a choice that is substantiated by the character traits of the character.

Again, in each of these activities, students have been offered choices that meet their interests, their ability level, their preferred working style and their learning style. In addition, since all students are working on the same expectation, they will all be able to share and participate in class discussions and presentations.

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